Navy

A400:Air Traffic Controller

Navy air traffic controllers perform duties similar to civilian air traffic controllers and play a key role in the effective use of naval airpower throughout the world in operational and training environments. Navy ACs are responsible for safely and effectively directing aircraft operating from airfields or the decks of aircraft carriers. They also control the movement of aircraft and vehicles on airfield taxiways and issue flight instructions to pilots by radio. Air traffic controllers provide air traffic control services in air traffic control towers, radar air traffic control facilities, fleet area control and surveillance facilities, and air operations offices ashore and afloat. They also operate radio communication systems and light signals, direct aircraft under visual flight rules and instrument flight rules conditions, and operate surveillance radar, precision radar, data link approach systems and secondary surveillance radar (IFF) equipment.


Is there a clearance required?: No

Is this a combat or support MOS?: Support


Military Duties:

Controlling and directing air traffic at airfields and on aircraft carriers using radio, radar, and other signaling devices. Providing aircraft with critical information on other air traffic, navigation systems, and airfield conditions essential to safe operations. Operating and adjusting computer-based ground/carrier-controlled navigation and radar approach systems. Interpreting data shown on radar screens and plotting aircraft positions. Maintaining aeronautical charts and maps.

Military Duties Translated:

Operate surveillance radar, precision radar, data link approach systems, Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) equipment and other air traffic control equipment. Maintain current flight planning information and reference material, and assist the pilots in preparation and processing flight plans. Provide air traffic control services in air traffic control towers, radar air traffic control facilities, fleet area control and surveillance facilities, and air operations offices ashore and afloat. They operate radio communication systems and light signals, and direct aircraft under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) and Instrument Flight Rules (IFR).

Some civilian jobs best suited to this type of military experience:

Air Traffic Controller